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nations, it is our view that the palestinians should not take this to the un in the short term. we have our urge them not to do that. clearly, if they do so, we will have to consider the right way to vote. in the end, we will not solve this problem at the united nations. this problem will be solved by israelis and palestinians sitting down and negotiating, and there may be dangerous from pushing it too early at the un, in terms of a cutoff of funds for the palestinian authority, and all the other consequences that could follow. let's get negotiations going. >> we expect to hear more about the situation in the middle east, in particular, israel and gaza, when the un dangerous from pushing it too early at the un, in terms of a cutoff of>> you cy council meets. officers changed the army so that it is a long- term army purify your shoulders -- soldiers in the labor market. over five years we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women who were willing to serve their country as volunteers, and they had the same tradition and same culture, the same loyalty and dedication as an
to the palestinian status at the un. susan rice said in her speech that the boat places further obstacles in the path of peace. you can see the vote today in our video library at c-span.org. before the votes took place, defense secretary leon panetta that with the israeli defense minister. they also talked about iran's nuclear row graham. ran's nuclear- proi program. the program is about 40 minutes. >> it is my pleasure to welcome minister barak to the pentagon. i would like to begin by taking a moment to pay tribute. he has made an announcement that he intends to retire from political life in israel. our friendship stretches back a number of decades to i think the beginning -- my time as member of congress and as a member of the clinton administration. we also worked closely when i was director of the cia and had a number of meetings in that capacity and certainly now as secretary defense. since i became secretary of defense, we have been in regular communication and have built a strong working relationship. i could not have more respect for he is brilliant, strategic mind. he has one of the best in
to the united nations where palestinian leaders will be bidding for a u.n. recognition of state could. the resolution would live to the palestinian authority you an observer status from entity to non-member state, like the vatican, and is expected to pass the 193-nation general assembly. at least 50 european states plan to vote for it. israel and the united states are strongly opposed because it would conflict with the peace deal. streaming live here on c-span. >> sri lanka, chile, somalia, china, iraq, grenada, guyana, the palestine, venezuela, vietnam, catarrh, khazikstan, cuba, kuwait, kenya, 11 non, libya, molly, malaysia, madagascar, egypt, morocco, saudi arabia, mauritania, namibia, nigeria, nicaragua, india, yemen, qaeda stan, .elarus mr. president, this important draft resolution is aimed at taking a historic decision, granting palestine the status of non-member observer state. the preamble of the drafted resolution refers to the unacceptability of territory by force stipulated in the charter. the other paragraph in the preamble reaffirms the right of the palestinian people to
have all of the arab rulers -- this guy named muammar gaddafi should go, and you had the u.n. security council resolution. those two are huge. it is, particularly when you are looking for legitimacy. -- it is hard, particularly when you are looking for legitimacy. the one thing we need to be careful about though is the conclusion that we have and grace democratic change and it is irreversible. which we have been braced -- the conclusion that we have been braced democratic change -- we have embraced democratic change. particularly after each. tahrir square. that was very different from the 9/11 paradigm. when you ask the american public's -- public is the uprising in the arab world driven by people looking for democracy or by arab groups, many square. people said it was ordinarily -- ordinary people like them. are they favorable or unfavorable, many had favorable reviews of the arab and muslim people. 70% expressed -- that has changed over the past year. what we see is really a change where you have more people saying the arab uprisings are more about people try to take control. now, th
from the map. and if the u.n. is going to persist in helping those who want to see a member of the united nations wiped off the map, then the u.n. does not need to continue to have the united states as a member. that's the way it ought to be. it ought to be clear. we joined the u.n. the u.n. has a charter that will protect its member states. and if you're going to assist those who want to obliterate israel, then we will no longer be a part of the united nations because it's not united, it is anti-semetic and we will not be part of an un-united nations. it's time to get serious because people are dying around the world including our own ambassador. time to quit covering for the truth. let us get down to what the truth is and let the chips fall where they may. let us find out who did what wrong and hope and pray there was no criminal activity. certainly there was negligence, but you don't know until we get a proper investigation. and an attorney general cannot properly investigate himself. an attorney general cannot properly investigate his boss. one department, the f.b.i., ca
.m. eastern. a number of senators have been meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice in the wake of her comments following the attack on the benghazi consulate. just wrapping up is a brief news conference and statement with senators. here is a look. >> i had a very candid ambassador rice embassador ric and the deputy director of the cia. [inaudible] she said if it was a spontaneous demonstration. it was not. there was telling evidence at that time. >> [inaudible] i am very disappointed in our intelligence community. i think they failed in many ways. i think it would be pretty clear that to explain this episode as related to a video that created a mob that turned into a riot was far-filled. at the end of the day, we are going to get to the bottom of this. we have to have a system that we trust. if you don't know what happened, just say you don't know what happened. you can say "i do not want to give that information." you can say the american people got bad information from president obama in the days after. the question is should they have been given the information at all? if you can d
that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of which has not been very much observed. i think we have ideas for iran. that will give really intrusive inspecti
and that is the un's help is needed. so we see that continuing policy of focusing on military support to president hadi as well. >> thank you. >> thank you. donna cranfield for the middle east. i agree with both of your comments and statements that the narrow view of our security approach is counterproductive and development approach should be taken. a bit too pushy both a little bit further in defining what that would look like. imagine you said at the pentagon and try to conceive of a programmer approach to be more project to an understanding that you don't have to be responsible for the next bomber who does slip through the cracks and understanding that the development approach i think we all see as fundamentally essential will take years if not decades to actually achieve it subject to so for the and medium term strategy, what is the alternative? pulling back and drum strikes may be something that i like to see. i guess that also with the mind of the last question that presidents hadi's rough embracing is seeking ownership in the way he mentioned that needs to happen -- [inaudible] so here is
. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be negatively impacted by the trading scheme at some point in the future. therefore we're moving forward this bipartisan bill to ensure u.s. operators will not ever be subjected to the illegal european scheme. i urge my colleagues to support this bipartisan, bicameral legislation, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from west virginia. mr. lahood: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield five minutes to the distinguished ranking member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized fo
with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received and besmirch her reputation is outrageous. host: president obama at a press conference. yesterday the ambassador he was talking about is susan rice, ambassador to the u.n. here's an image of her in the "washington times." and a quote from her. the best information and best assessment we have today is that in fact this was not a preplanned, premeditated attack. those are words she said just after the attack in benghazi. our question for you this morning is about the white house national security team. here's what steve tweets in. i am more confident of this national security team than the one that told me there were w.m.d. in iraq. morris in san diego, california, joins us now. republican caller. hi. caller: good morning. i have no confidence whatsoever in this national security team. in fact i have less confidence in the president. i think this whole thing of benghazi leads right to the white house. right to the oval of
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
to war without a declaration by congress but accepting international authority from the u.n. or nato or even for preemptive wars, otherwise known as aggression. a financial political crisis as a -- number four, a financial political crisis as a consequence of excessive debt, unfunded liabilities, spending, bailouts and gross discrepancy in gross dispribution go from the mill class to the rich. the danger of central economic planning by the federal reserve must be understood. world government taking over local and u.s. sompt by getting involved in the -- sovereignty by getting involved in the issues of war, welfare, banking, taxes, property, ownership and private -- private ownership of guns must be addressed. happily, there's an answer for these very dangerous trends. what a wonderful world it would be if we accepted the moral premise of act of aggression. a suggestion is always too simplistic, utopian, dangerous and unrealistic to strive for such an ideal. the answer to that is after thousands of years, the acceptance of government force to rule over the people at the sacrifice of l
that shows weapons of mass destruction being used and stuff like that and it shows the un running a caravan with army trucks and taking these weapons and to syria. the fellow who did the movie to begin with got murdered. putfilm -- i'm going to some of it up on you to but you've got to see this. some of it is so graphic that i'm going to have to edit it myself before i can put it up on youtube. democrats hate soldiers. i don't know why they hate him so bad. they did not want petraeus to make that more work. this movie is going to make amends with them. guest: i look forward to seeing the evidence. but one of the great myths coming out of the war is weapons of mass destruction were taken to syria. i looked at this evidence that has been available in the best evidence i can see is there were truck convoys moving from baghdad to syria just before the american invasion. but what they were, the evidence indicates were the baath party records, personal jewelry and cash that was later used to fund the beginning of the insurgency in iraq. it was not weapons of mass destruction. there are films you
, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say about because we went to bosnia and not because they were a threat to the united states of america but beca
. that is where things are happening. in two weeks, president of boss will be at the u.n. -- president abass will be at the u.n. the casualty is the palestinian authority and the president has been marginalized and looks irrelevant to what is happening. in my view, gaza will emerge as the seat -- it will be much freer than egypt. i think that is where things are trending. you could add at some point that the west bank may trend towards jordan. that may be the next step. we may wake. if the administration decides to intervene in a few years, it may be at a time when the entire dynamic of the conflict has shifted. i suspect the muslim brotherhood in egypt is not interested in a settlement where it would have to make concessions on jerusalem either. the outcome is now that is different from a truce. it would be ironic though, precisely around the time the u.s. finally came on board -- it is not that. is not that at all. the u.s. and all the western partners have come to that conclusion. >> you have been very patient. this will be the last. >> aaron, i am jim smith. i am the u.s. ambassador to s
in september at the u.n., and now we have interesting results from two states here from washington state and from colorado. in addition to the many states -- i think there are 17 or 18 -- where marijuana can be used for medicinal purposes. in these two states, they can be used for recreational purposes. there we have the pressure from the region joined with some of the pressure and trends in shift in public opinion in the u.s., which i think will contribute an ad to greater pressure on the administration at the national level to rethink its policy on drugs, which is clearly having very negative effects are perceived to having negative effects in terms of crime, violence, and corruption in many countries in latin america. i think obama administration will probably say it has done some things to move forward on this issue, talking about shared responsibility, but i think despite some changes in the discourse, the essential elements of the policy have been pretty unchanged until now. again, this does open some -- possibilities. the reaction in mexico will be particularly critical to see whe
permission has driven the internet's unparalleled success. at the un last year, president obama spoke strongly about this, saying the u.s. will support a free, open internet so individuals have the of permission to open up their minds. no one has been a more forceful advocate of the economic and social opportunities of the internet than hillary clinton, who delivered a landmark speech in 2010 when she said one of the most fundamental freedoms of the internet age was the freedom to connect. the idea that government should not prevent people from connecting to the internet, to websites, or to each other. internet freedom is sometimes cited to average it as an obstacle to addressing cyber security issues. i disagree. not because i question the importance of the issues and magnitude of the threat, because they are very serious problems we have to address. but i believe, based on my experience, that we can address those issues without undermining core values like internet freedom and privacy. we have put our money is where our mouths are. we have taken important steps. we developed a code
as the u.n. is prepared to help facilitate all efforts in this regard. but people are dying every day and cities are being targeted every day. this humanitarian crisis is growing exponentially. we need a ceasefire now. followed immediately by negotiations on the underlying issues. the crisis underscores that the status quo is unsustainable and the solutions must be found to the problems of gaza and palestinians as a whole. core elements of the security council resolution remain unimplemented. once is fully restored and the violence ends, the cease-fire will have to address the underlying causes, including a fall opening of [indiscernible] and an end to weapons smuggling. it is clear the international community must speak with one voice to prevent a return to violence. i plan to keep in touch with leaders and i have asked my special coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain o
that you have millions of people un document. if you move people out of that status, that will have a positive benefit not just to people, but to wages being depressed. equity is a critical issue. we face a significant challenge -- in the short-term, medium- term, and long term, there is so much inequity in education. it is not something that the political process likes to discuss, but it is one in which we need to think more creatively about how -- ideas not good for our -- it is not good for us in the medium or long-term. >> nice to go last on this because i can think. [laughter] a really high-quality pre-k -- >> i agree. >> education for kids at the bottom of the income scale. this is supported by conservatives and liberals alike. a nobel-laureate economist to i think is associated with republicans has written eloquently about how critically important -- and there has got to be a significant government will pick it will not happen withou -- significant government role. it will not happen without. and this is of be, but full employment. during my lifetime, the only time i've seen
grover norquist. this man is an un-elected person who is making you sign a pledge that has nothing to do with -- with the country. guest: thank you. respectfully disagree on all accounts. especially at the very beginning. you made the case that we are talking about 47%. the fact is, republicans are not. democrats are raising this issue over and over. they see political advantage in it, but one of our frustrations as republicans with that 47% is that many of them don't have the good-paying type of jobs they want that would allow them to be taxpayers. our frustration is that we have an economy that is flying so low and so slow it's very weak. we have so many people unemployed. so many people on food stamps. so many people who don't have a choice they have to rely on the government. we want that 47% to be reduced by stronger economic growth. we want those who begin in the lower classes of income to become middle tax taxpayers. and to rise to higher levels as well. that's our frustration. host: congressman braidy, we have been talking about this fiscal cliff that congress is grappling with a
presidential appointment as you and ambassador -- u.n. ambassador. in both of these positions, she has been independent and undeterred by ideology. most recently she advise the president that the united states should go into libya on the side of the rebels. susan rice has more than earned every office and every honor she has received, striving for and achieving top honors in high school academics here in washington as a phi beta kappa graduate of stanford university, as a rhodes scholar, as a ph.d. from oxford, and as a brilliant, tough-minded diplomat. we do not attend to stand by while ambassador rice, who had nothing to do with the tragic benghazi attack or its aftermath, it is made the scapegoat of the tragedy because she relate to the public the only official intelligence that was available to the administration at the time. the rush to judgment against the ambassador is particularly unprofessional and reckless considering that the intelligence irrefutably documents her public remarks. we will not allow a brilliant public servant's record to be mugged to cut off her consideration to be
the torch. the statement captured the essence of his success, his extraordinary leadership, his un flinching patriotism, his belief in the common good, his devotion to the unending fight for a more perfect union. yes, mr. president, tip carried this torch for all who believed the purpose of politics is to improve the lives of others. tip carried the torch for the underdog, for the person on the street, for the families struggling to pay the bills. he carried the torch of opportunity, equality, and to every budget negotiation, every legislative battle, every bipartisan agreement. tip carried the personal -- personal manifestation of the american dream and he carried the torch for everyone else who strived to achieve it. for tip, standing on principle is not about political gain, it was about fighting for the voiceless and for the aspirations of the middle class. for tip the effort to reform and save social security was not about figures on a page, it was about the seniors struggling to make ends meet. that's why we were always so proud of what he did with preg reagan to prolong the life of so
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